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Quadricep Injuries, What's Going On & Acupuncture For Recovery

Updated: Dec 21, 2023


Quadricep Injuries, Acupuncture for relief at Acute Acupuncture 163 The Terrace, Wellington Central, Wellington
Quadricep Injuries, Acupuncture for relief at Acute Acupuncture 163 The Terrace, Wellington Central, Wellington

The quadriceps muscles are one of the largest muscle groups in the human body and are responsible for extending the knee joint. This group of muscles is composed of four muscles: the rectus femoris, Vastus-Lateralis, Vastus-Intermedius, and Vastus-Medialis. Each of these muscles has its origin, insertion, and functions within the larger muscle group.


Rectus-Femoris: The rectus-femoris muscle has its origin at the anterior inferior iliac spine and the acetabulum of the hip joint, and inserts via the patella to the tibial tuberosity. This muscle is unique in that it crosses both the hip and knee joints, making it responsible for both hip flexion and knee extension. It flexes the hip along with the sartorius and iliopsoas and extends the lower leg at the knee, working in conjunction with the other three quadriceps muscles.


Vastus-Lateralis: The vastus-lateralis muscle has its origin at the lateral lip of the linea aspera of the femur and inserts via the patella to the tibial tuberosity. Its main function is to extend the knee joint. It's located on the lateral side of the thigh. This muscle is the largest of the quadriceps which includes: rectus femoris, vastus-intermedius, and vastus-medialis. Together, the quadriceps act on the knee and hip to promote movement as well as strength and stability.


Vastus-Intermedius: The vastus-intermedius muscle has its origin at the anterior and lateral surfaces of the femur and insertion via the patella to the tibial tuberosity. This muscle is responsible for extending the knee joint. Together with other muscles that are part of the Quadricep femoris, it facilitates knee extension.


Vastus-Medialis: The vastus-medialis muscle has its origin at the medial lip of the linea aspera of the femoral shaft and inserts via the patella to the tibial tuberosity. This muscle is also involved in extending the knee joint and is important in stabilizing the patella during movements like squatting and jumping.


Together, the quadricep muscles work to extend the knee joint, allowing us to perform movements like walking, running, and jumping. However, these muscles can be subject to injury, such as strains or tears. While traditional treatments like rest and physical therapy can be effective, acupuncture is also becoming a popular alternative treatment option.


Acupuncture is a form of traditional Chinese medicine that involves the insertion of thin needles into specific points along the body's energy pathways, or meridians, to promote healing and balance. In the case of quadricep muscle injuries, acupuncture can be used to decrease pain and inflammation, improve blood flow and circulation, and promote faster healing.


Specific acupuncture points may be chosen based on the location and severity of the injury, as well as the individual's overall health and wellness. In addition to needle insertion, other acupuncture modalities like cupping and electroacupuncture may also be used to further enhance healing and pain relief. If you have a quadricep injury this may be subsidized through the Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC). To know if you can get acupuncture and cupping for the injury the patient must have an injury under twelve months from the date of the injury, an approved claim with ACC, an ACC45 (unique code to the individual or patient), date of injury, and read codes that apply for this injury. Contrary to popular belief you do not need to be referred by your General Practitioner (GP) or physiotherapists to obtain the ability to receive acupuncture for this injury. You are in control of your health, and the management of your health, you also have the power to choose the treatment of your choice, and what is right for your situation.


The quadriceps muscles are essential for everyday movements and athletic performance, and injuries to this muscle group can be debilitating. While traditional treatments like rest and physical therapy can be effective, acupuncture is a promising alternative treatment option that may promote faster healing and pain relief. As with any intervention, it is essential to discuss the use of acupuncture with a qualified acupuncturist and to ensure that it is safe and appropriate for the individual or patient. After treatments, one may feel relaxed, energized, and rejuvenated. It is important to communicate with your practitioner about your experience to ensure that you receive the maximum benefits from these treatments. Click the button below and book a complementary 15-minute consultation at Acute Acupuncture 163 The Terrace, Wellington Central, Wellington. Let's discuss if acupuncture is the right thing for you. Thank you for taking the time to read this Blog Post, don't forget to like, subscribe, and share this post with others. If you have any questions or concerns check out Acute-Acupuncture Wellington Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs), as we find this help to answer most people's questions, and please leave a comment below.


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