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Achilles Pain, Achilles Tendonitis, Acupuncture Wellington Central, Wellington

Updated: Apr 18


Achilles Injuries, Acupuncture Near Me, Acute Acupuncture 163 The Terrace, Wellington Central, Wellington.
Achilles Injuries, Acupuncture Near Me, Acute Acupuncture 163 The Terrace, Wellington Central, Wellington.

The Achilles tendon is one of the thickest and strongest tendons in the human body. It connects the calf muscle, the gastrocnemius, to the heel bone. It is responsible for the foot's plantar flexion, allowing us to walk, run, and jump. While the Achilles tendon is a crucial component for human movement in the leg, it is also prone to injury and pain. Tendon injuries can be debilitating and painful, hindering a person's ability to move and exercise.


Acupuncture has been recognized as a less invasive and potentially effective treatment for Achilles pain, Achilles tendonitis, and other tendon injuries. Achilles tendonitis is painful when the Achilles tendon becomes inflamed and irritated. It is usually caused by repetitive strain or overuse. While traditional treatments for Achilles tendonitis include resting and elevating the foot, physiotherapy, and anti-inflammatory medications, acupuncture has been shown to provide additional benefits for patients in Wellington.


A study conducted in 2016 by Lin et al. found that acupuncture combined with physiotherapy was more effective in treating Achilles tendonitis than physiotherapy alone. The study involved a randomized controlled trial of 120 patients with Achilles tendonitis, with participants randomly assigned to receive either acupuncture combined with physical therapy or physical therapy alone. The study results showed that the group receiving acupuncture had significantly improved pain scores and increased range of motion compared to the physiotherapy-only group.


Achilles Injuries, Acupuncture Near Me, Acute Acupuncture 163 The Terrace, Wellington Central, Wellington.
Achilles Injuries, Acupuncture Near Me, Acute Acupuncture 163 The Terrace, Wellington Central, Wellington.

Acupuncture works by increasing blood flow and reducing inflammation in the affected area. Acupuncture needles are inserted into specific points along the meridians or neuropathways of the body, stimulating the body's natural healing response. The gastrocnemius muscle is one of the muscles directly involved in Achilles tendon function. By targeting the gastrocnemius with acupuncture, blood circulation and oxygenation of the Achilles tendon can be improved, promoting healing.


In addition to its potential benefits for treating Achilles tendonitis, acupuncture has also shown promising results in treating Achilles pain and other tendon injuries. A systematic review and meta-analysis conducted in 2018 by Li et al. found that acupuncture effectively decreased pain and improved function in patients with lateral epicondylitis, also known as tennis elbow.



Acupuncture is a potential complementary treatment for Achilles tendonitis, Achilles pain, and other tendon injuries. Further research is being conducted to determine the optimal treatment protocols and to identify which patients may benefit the most from acupuncture. However, acupuncture is worth considering for patients seeking a less invasive and effective treatment option. It is essential to consult with a qualified acupuncturist. After treatments, one may feel relaxed, energized, and rejuvenated. Communicating with your practitioner about your experience is crucial to ensure you receive the maximum benefits from these treatments. Click the button below and book a complementary 15-minute consultation at Acute Acupuncture Wellington. Let's discuss if acupuncture is the right thing for you. Thank you for taking the time to read this Blog Post. Don't forget to like, subscribe, and share this post with others. If you have any questions or concerns, check out Acute-Acupuncture Wellington Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs), as we find this helps answer most people's questions. Please leave a comment below.


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