top of page
home page edited

Scientific Context for Acupuncture Terms, What this means in Western Medicine Science

Updated: Apr 18


Acute Acupuncture 163 The Terrace, Wellington Central, Wellington.
Scientific Context for Acupuncture Terms, What this means in Western Medicine Science

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and acupuncture use concepts such as yin, yang, dampness, heat, cold, and wind are fundamental principles used to describe patterns of disharmony in the body. While these concepts are deeply rooted in TCM philosophy and may not have direct equivalents in Western Medicine Science (WMS), I can attempt to provide generalized associations based on WMS terminology or some diagnoses or conditions that correlate.


Yin and Yang: Yin and yang are complementary forces representing the dualistic nature of the universe. Yin is associated with qualities such as darkness, cold, rest, and substance, while yang is associated with light, heat, activity, and function.

Western Medicine Science Context for Yin Yang: In Western Medicine Science (WMS), yin and yang are concepts that can be loosely related to homeostasis and balance within the body's physiological processes in the organs and systems.



Dampness: Dampness in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) refers to an excessive body accumulation of fluids or moisture. It can manifest as physical symptoms such as heaviness and swelling, or it can be accompanied by illnesses or how the patients may present in the clinic at acute acupuncture.

Western Medical Science Context for Dampness: The perspective in Western Medicine Science (WMS) may be associated with conditions like edema (fluid retention), pitting edema, inflammation, excess mucus production, certain infections, or being overweight.



Heat: In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), heat represents an excess or hyperactivity of metabolic processes in the body. It can manifest as symptoms of inflammation, fever, redness, excessive warmth, or feeling hot.


Acute Acupuncture 163 The Terrace, Wellington Central, Wellington.
Scientific Context for Acupuncture Terms, What this means in Western Medicine Science

Cold: In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), cold signifies a deficiency or lack of metabolic activity and circulation in the body. It can manifest as symptoms of cold intolerance, pale complexion, or a feeling of coldness.

Western Medicine Science Context for Cold: Cold or coldness the perspective in Western Medicine Science (WMS) may be associated with conditions like poor circulation, hypothyroidism, feeling of cold, or reduced metabolic activity.



Wind: In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), wind refers to an energetic force that may cause imbalances and rapidly disperse pathological factors throughout the body. Wind is often associated with dynamic, migratory, or rapidly changing symptoms. Wind is also called the speartip of disease and may be accompanied by other pathological factors.

Western Medical Science Context for Wind: The perspective in Western Medicine Science (WMS) can be compared to symptoms associated with certain neurological disorders, such as Parkinson's Syndrome, muscle spasms, or conditions involving rapid changes in the body, such as allergies.



It's important to note that these associations are general and may not be all-encompassing. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and Western Medicine Science (WMS) have different conceptual frameworks and diagnostic approaches. While Western Medicine Science (WMS) often focuses on identifying specific diseases or conditions, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) emphasizes patterns of disharmony. It aims to restore balance within the body and get to the root of the problem. Therefore, consulting with practitioners from both disciplines is recommended for a comprehensive understanding of your health and appropriate treatment options. Thank you for taking the time to read this post, if you like this post please like, subscribe, and share this post. If you have any more questions or concerns, check out our Acute-Acupuncture Wellington Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs), which we find answer most people's questions.


Comentários


  • LinkedIn
  • Pintrest
  • Instagram
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
bottom of page